Published: Mon, February 11, 2019
Worldwide | By Myra Stephens

Theresa May Promises U.K. Lawmakers Brexit Vote by February 27

Theresa May Promises U.K. Lawmakers Brexit Vote by February 27

"Not only will this help to support jobs throughout the United Kingdom but it will also be a solid foundation for us to build an even stronger trading relationship with Switzerland as we leave the EU", International Trade minister Liam Fox said in a statement.

The impasse risks a chaotic "no deal" departure for Britain, which could be painful for businesses and ordinary people on both sides of the Channel.

Should the parliament give May more time on Thursday, it would mark the second extension since her Brexit deal was defeated by MPs in January.

If May succeeds in winning changes to her Brexit deal in the next few days she could bring it back for a debate and vote before February 14, and this more general debate would not go ahead.

Should the prime minster fail in her bid to secure concessions from the European Union before her speech, she plans to ask for more time and promise a vote on other Brexit options at the end of February, the Sunday Telegraph and other British media report.

"If the meaningful vote has not happened, so in other words things have not concluded, then Parliament would have that further opportunity by no later than 27 February", said Mr Brokenshire. "That gives that sense of timetable, clarity and objective on what we're doing".

Brokenshire's promise of another vote two weeks later is created to discourage lawmakers from binding the government's hands this week.

And International Monetary Fund (IMF) boss Christine Lagarde said no arrangement Mrs May reached with Brussels would be as good for the economy as membership - and a no-deal Brexit would be "brutal".

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, who has written to the prime minister setting out his demands for a Brexit deal he could support, accused May of an "utterly cynical" approach.

In a letter to Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn dated Sunday, May opposed his party's appeal for the country to remain in a customs union with Brussels.

May is due to report back to parliament on her negotiations with the European Union on 13 February, a few weeks after she secured MPs' support to go back to Brussels.

There are few signs of concessions coming May's way from Brussels.

That leaves May battling to persuade a reluctant European Union to look again at the Irish backstop - a fallback policy created to prevent the resurrection of a hard border in Ireland if talks to find a long-term trade arrangement fail.

May has been trying to win a legal assurance giving Britain the right eventually to drop the backstop and negotiate its own trade deals.

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