Published: Wed, December 05, 2018
Worldwide | By Myra Stephens

Facebook gave Netflix and Airbnb preferential data access to data, documents reveal

Facebook gave Netflix and Airbnb preferential data access to data, documents reveal

These were sealed by the courts, but United Kingdom authorities seized them from the plaintiff in that lawsuit while he was in London as part of their investigation into Facebook's practices and handling of user data.

A United Kingdom parliamentary committee has published 250 pages worth of Facebook documents, including emails sent between CEO Mark Zuckerberg and other senior executives.

The correspondence, which includes internal emails sent between Mark Zuckerberg and the social network's staff, were obtained from the chief of a software firm that is suing the tech giant.

Six4Three's founder, Ted Kramer, had obtained them as part of a legal discovery process in a US lawsuit against Facebook that his company has brought against the social network in California.

"We stand by the platform changes we made in 2015 to stop a person from sharing their friends' data with developers", the company said in a statement.

Collins and his committee have been investigating Facebook and its relationship with Cambridge Analytica, the highly controversial and supposedly defunct political consulting group that helped Donald Trump win the White House.

As for the DCMS's assertions regarding how the company's "reciprocity" provision and its Onavo VPN app dealt with user data, Facebook points out that users "had the choice" as to whether or not they would opt in and share their data.

Facebook's seized files published by MPs
UK parliament releases internal Facebook documents

Facebook, which has described the Six4Three case as baseless, said the released communications are misleading without additional context, but did not elaborate.

The data-hungry mammoth wanted to know how people used their mobile phones, so it changed Facebook's mobile app to enable it to harvest more information from devices it was installed on.

Facebook is accused of using this data to assess "not just how many people had downloaded apps, but how often they used them".

The documents show an exchange between Zuckerberg and senior executive Justin Osofsky in 2013, in which they made a decision to stop giving friends' data access to Vine on the day that social media rival Twitter launched the video-sharing service.

'To mitigate any bad PR, Facebook planned to make it as hard of possible for users to know that this was one of the underlying features of the upgrade of their app'.

"Yup, go for it", Zuckerberg responded.

Facebook could not immediately be reached for comment.

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