Published: Wed, October 31, 2018
Electronics | By Shannon Stone

Google homepage is getting a user interest based revamp

Google homepage is getting a user interest based revamp

Google wants the site to surface relevant information for users by predicting what they're interested in rather than waiting for users to type in a search term. Well, it's a bit more crowded now, at least on your mobile device, thanks to the inclusion of a customized news feed. Given Google's system, it could be progressively an issue of when you see Discover as opposed to whether it appears in any case. Info cards have been a mainstay of Google's mobile experience for a while, and that isn't likely to change in mobile browsers.

If you visit google.com, Google's home page, on your mobile device, you will no longer just see a simple search box. The overhaul mission that began as Google Now was changed to Google Feed past year and now it has been rebranded as Google Discover.

Well for this, I have a better solution for you, as you can turn it off or on your mobile browser by going to the right top corner there is menu bar situated there, go to the menu bar then open settings and then Discover and then Don't show on homepage.

The bottom-right corner lets you select whether you see more or less of the subject you want to see.

In order for it to know what to show in Discover, Google uses the information gathered from other Google products and your device. Here, you can follow any topics that interest you and hide any that don't strike your fancy. The cards have a title, a cover photo, a summary, and the website name to provide you a snapshot of the article. Bonnie is the person that makes sure the content on this site is error-free, new and accurate for the readers.

The feed will also show you evergreen topics when suitable. Google's software will also estimate your level of expertise in a particular topic and show you appropriate content based on that.

This comes around the same time Google is also bringing the capabilities of Google Lens to Google Images on the mobile web, one more step from Google toward making Search move beyond its text-based legacy.

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