Published: Wed, October 10, 2018
Electronics | By Shannon Stone

Microsoft puts Windows 10 update on hold after file deletion reports

Microsoft puts Windows 10 update on hold after file deletion reports

Microsoft is now testing an updated version of the Windows 10 October 2018 Update that promises to fix a serious issue that led the company to pull the update following its public release last week.

Doing what they should have done a week ago, before RTM, Microsoft has released a new build of the Windows 10 October 2018 update to Windows 10 Insiders in the Slow Ring and Release Preview Ring. It is unclear as to what is causing files to randomly go missing or get deleted on users' systems.

The company points toward Windows 10's Known Folder Redirection (KFR) feature, which allows Windows folders (like Desktop, etc) to be redirected from their default locations to new locations. So, to solve the problem, Microsoft introduced code that would delete those old, empty folders.

Security updates to Internet Explorer, Windows Media Player, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Peripherals, Windows Shell, Windows Kernel, Windows Datacenter Networking, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Microsoft Edge, Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows Linux, and the Microsoft JET Database Engine.
You create "D:\documents" and change the location of the files known folder from the original "old" location c:\users\username\documents to D:\documents. This feature turned on KFR for the Documents and/or Pictures folders based on the user's choice but did not move the existing files from the original "old" location to the new location. In previous feedback from the Windows 10 April 2018 Update, users with KFR reported an extra, empty copy of Known Folders on their device. During this process the system prompts the user and asks if they would like to move the files to the new location.

As for users that were affected, the firm says that "Microsoft Support is assisting customers and trying to recover data" and that this support can also be offered by the retail support services in-store.

Microsoft stopped the update to investigate the issue and found the issue according to John Cable, Director of Program Management, Windows Servicing and Delivery. But we're shocked that Microsoft messed up in the first place. "We have added an ability for users to also provide an indication of impact and severity when filing User Initiated Feedback". Now it has re-released the update, fixing the issue while shedding some light on how many people were impacted by the bug.

Like this: