Published: Mon, October 08, 2018
Sci-tech | By April Francis

MI man makes shocking discovery about 30-year-old doorstop

MI man makes shocking discovery about 30-year-old doorstop

Upon receiving the meteorite, Sirbescu evaluated it and discovered it was an iron-nickel meteorite, composed of 8 to 8.5 percent iron and 11.5 percent nickel.

Weighing 22 pounds, it's also the sixth-largest recorded find in MI - and is believed to be worth $100,000, according to CMU.

The rock became a doorstop in a barn until Mazurek took it to a professor at Central Michigan University.

Mazurek became the rock's owner in 1988, when he bought a farm in Edmore, Michigan.

For additional verification, a piece of the rock was sent to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, which backed up the finding.

"It's the most valuable specimen I have ever held in my life, monetarily and scientifically", she added.

The farmer told him it was a meteorite, that it was part of the property and he could have it. The farmer and his father recovered it in the morning, digging it free - it was reportedly still warm to the touch when retrieved.

It has been named the "Edmore" meteorite after the town in which the farm is located.

A new buyer soon moved to Grand rapids, he would sometimes let the kids take it for essays in school, this man had no idea what "guest from space" can cost a small fortune.

He was inspired to have it checked out by the university after a rise in meteorite discoveries in MI.

"Just think, what I was holding is a piece of the early solar system that literally fell into our hands", she said.

A man has discovered a rock he's been using as a doorstop for 30 years is a meteorite worth more than $100,000. A colleague there further analyzed the sample, including with an acid test to reveal the Widmanstätten pattern, a property of most iron-nickel meteorites that can not be faked.

The Smithsonian and a mineral museum in ME are considering buying the meteorite - now called "Edmore" - for display, according to CMU.

The owner is considering selling the meteorite to a museum or collector, and has promised to give 10 percent of the sale to the university, the university said.

Like this: