Published: Fri, September 14, 2018
Sci-tech | By April Francis

Incredible video shows plane flying into eye of Hurricane Florence

Incredible video shows plane flying into eye of Hurricane Florence

Hurricane Florence will hit the Carolinas hard, producing catastrophic flooding, "life-threatening storm surge and destructive winds", according to a report on The Weather Channel.

Winds and rain were arriving later in SC, and a few people were still walking on the sand at Myrtle Beach while North Carolina was getting pounded.

As of 11 p.m., the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's projections for Hurricane Florence show 40-50 miles per hour winds affecting Chatham County.

Landfall is expected late Thursday or early Friday, and the National Hurricane Center fears the storm "will slow considerably or stall, leading to a prolonged and exceptionally heavy and risky rainfall event Friday-Sunday". Elsewhere, in the Appalachians and Mid-Atlantic states, Florence is expected to produce 3 to 6 inches of rain.

The storm is moving toward the northwest at 17 miles per hour (28 kph), the NHC said.

Florence is now a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

The storm surge risk will be highest between Southport, NC, and Surf City, NC.

The National Hurricane Center's latest predictions Wednesday had Florence hovering off Southeast shores for more than two days before making landfall near the North Carolina/South Carolina border, perhaps not until Saturday.

The message from North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper to residents was bleak.

The latest forecast track issued by the National Hurricane Center brings the western portion of the storm, potentially, to parts of Middle Georgia.

Duke Energy Co. said Florence could knock out electricity to three-quarters of its 4 million customers in the Carolinas, and outages could last for weeks.

Florence's weakening as it neared the coast created tension between some who left home and authorities who anxious that the storm could still be deadly.

The "Hurricane Hunter" is specially equipped and operated by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to fly through storms to collect data, playing a major role in hurricane forecasting.

More than 300,000 people have already evacuated from the coast, McMaster said, and traffic on the highway was moving steadily on Wednesday. "Disaster is at the doorstep and is coming in", he said in a tweet.

At Nags Head on North Carolina's Hatteras Island, only a few people remained to take photos of angry waves topped with white froth.

Florence's weakening as it neared the coast created tension between some who left home and authorities who anxious that the storm could still be deadly.

"We hope to have something left when we get home", she said.

"There's really not a lot of good news", NOAA flight director Paul Flaherty said on "Shepard Smith Reporting".

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