Published: Fri, August 10, 2018
Worldwide | By Myra Stephens

Yemen war: Children killed in Saudi-led air strike on bus

Yemen war: Children killed in Saudi-led air strike on bus

It was there, as the students sat waiting to resume their journey home on Thursday, that a Saudi-led coalition airstrike hit their school bus.

"The Coalition will take all necessary measures against the terrorist, criminal acts of the terrorist Iranian-Houthi militia, such as recruiting child soldiers, throwing them in battlefields and using them as tools and covers to their terrorist acts", coalition spokesperson Col.

Footage from the Houthi media office showed a boy wearing a blue backpack with a UNICEF logo being carried into a hospital emergency room with blood pouring down his face and over his traditional Yemeni thawb, an ankle-length garment.

The world has forgotten Yemen's bloody war, but when you look at these young victims - their tiny bodies, some still struggling for life - you won't be able to forget them.

"Scores killed, even more injured, most under the age of ten", the head of the ICRC in Yemen, Johannes Bruwer, said on his Twitter account, adding that the ICRC in Yemen is "sending additional supplies to hospitals to cope with the influx".

The coalition said it had carried out what it called "legitimate military action" in the area targeting Huthi rebels responsible for a deadly missile attack on the Saudi city of Jizan on Wednesday.

The Houthi spokesman's comments came at the same time the coalition warplanes hit the Houthi-controlled capital Sanaa 11 times, with no reports of casualties yet. The military action in Saada province, which lies between Amran and Saudi Arabia, was in line with global humanitarian law, he said.

Last week, Yemeni medical officials said the coalition conducted airstrikes in the rebel-held port city of Hodeida, killing at least 28 people and wounding 70.

The school bus that was bombed was reportedly carrying children back to religious education classes after a picnic near the city of Dahyan, according to reports from Save the Children and Al Jazeera.

Col. Al-Maliki affirmed that the leaders and militants responsible for launching ballistic missiles and targeting civilians would be held accountable under the Coalition's efforts to prevent terrorist elements from compromising regional and worldwide security.

The Iran-aligned Houthis regularly fire into Saudi Arabia and have targeted its capital, Riyadh, with ballistic missiles.

The following year, a coalition of Arab states led by Saudi Arabia intervened in the conflict.

According to Al Jazeera, the Saudi coalition claimed it had targeted "missile launchers", but Yemen-based reporters who have witnessed numerous attacks in civilian-populated areas vigorously disputed the claim.

In another video, which appears to show the immediate aftermath of the strike, several lifeless bodies of children lay under a blown-up bus.

The United Nations has repeatedly criticized the actions of the coalition.

Impoverished Yemen, on the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, is now in the world's worst humanitarian crisis, with more than 22.2 million people in need of assistance.

Earlier this week, the UN Special Envoy for Yemen, Martin Griffiths, convened a consultative meeting in the United Kingdom of 22 Yemeni public figures and women activists as part of his efforts to end the war.

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