Published: Thu, August 09, 2018
Sports | By Juana Wells

NCAA adopts college basketball reforms for draft, recruiting

NCAA adopts college basketball reforms for draft, recruiting

And then, the announcement of a litany of changes came on Wednesday.

Basketball student athletes can now take up 10 official visits between Aug.1 of their junior year and October 15 after their high school graduation: five as a junior and five as senior, according to the NCAA.

The NCAA's rule changes include allowing players to work with an agent while declaring for the National Basketball Association draft.

One of the main changes includes giving players the opportunity to enter the NBA Draft and return to school if they are undrafted, pending future action from the NBA and the NBPA. They can also attend events during the last two weekends in June but only if the event sare approved by the Nation Federation of State High School Associations, organized by groups affiliated with high schools, and occur at a middle school, high school or college.

All player-agent relationships, however, must be in writing, disclosed to the NCAA and ended when the player comes back to school.

In addition to recruiting calendar changes and increases to the number of official visits recruits can make to schools, the NCAA has developed a form of subpoena power it previously lacked, requiring all school presidents, chancellors and athletic department members to contractually comply with all investigations. The NCAA says that will save time since investigators would no longer have to independently confirm information outlined by other agencies or outside investigations. Coaches and athletics staff must now also report any income over $600 from a source outside the school, such as an apparel company.

No schools were mentioned, but two Federal Bureau of Investigation reports, one in September and another in April, have identified recruiting practices that violate NCAA rules involving prospects who wound up at several schools, including Kansas. "They deserve nothing less". "Things have changed. I'm not sure what's improved", one coach said.

"I'll give you an example: I'm here in the Bahamas, and the CEO of USA Basketball, Jim Tooley, is here and he's saying 'Wait a minute. It doesn't fix anything".

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