Published: Sat, July 14, 2018
Medicine | By Tracy Klein

CDC warning on Kellogg's Honey Smacks: "Do not eat this cereal"

CDC warning on Kellogg's Honey Smacks:

U.S. health officials have issued a stark warning against eating Honey Smacks, the popular Kellogg's breakfast cereal, after it was linked to a salmonella outbreak that has sickened more than 100 people in 33 states across the country in the past month.

Kellogg in June recalled an estimated 1.3 million cases of its Honey Smacks cereal from more than 30 USA states due to the potential for Salmonella contamination. "The FDA has learned that some retailers are still selling this product". The CDC reported that the outbreak has now impacted people in over 33 states.

Illnesses were first reported on March 3, and the most recent case was found on July 2.

The FDA is urging the public to report if the product is being offered for sale to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator in their region. In these patients, the Salmonellainfection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics. However, the FDA is asking that consumers avoid purchasing or consuming any Honey Smacks cereal for the time being - regardless of the dates on the box - out of an abundance of caution.

"Even if some of the cereal has been eaten and no one got sick, throw the rest of it away or return it for a refund", the CDC said in a statement on its website.

"Laboratory testing identified the outbreak strain of Salmonella in unopened and opened boxes of Honey Smacks cereal collected from retail locations and from ill people's homes", the new report stated. No deaths have been reported in this outbreak.

The illness usually lasts about four to seven days. Within 12 to 72 hours after infection, fever, stomach aches, and diarrhea begin. However, people in high-risk groups, which include children, older adults, pregnant women and anyone with a compromised immune system can develop serious complications which require hospitalization.

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