Published: Wed, July 11, 2018
Worldwide | By Myra Stephens

YouTube spends $25 million to fight fake news

YouTube spends $25 million to fight fake news

These cards will display information from third-parties, including Wikipedia and Encyclopedia Britannica, about certain historical and scientific topics that have been subject to misinformation and conspiracy theories-think events like the Moon landing or the Oklahoma City bombing.

YouTube also promises to provide grants to news organizations, on an application basis, "across approximately 20 global markets to support news organizations in building sustainable video operations". YouTube executives Neal Mohan, chief product officer and Robert Kyncl, chief business officer, outlined the new measures in a blog post Monday.

"YouTube pledges to make authoritative sources more readily accessible because it says authoritativeness is essential to viewers, especially during fast-moving, breaking news events".

Last year, Google Search had to address "fake news" appearing in "Featured Snippets" on the web and being offered as answers via Assistant and Google Home.

Company executives announced the effort at YouTube's NY offices.

YouTube also has begun testing features that distribute local news in the YouTube app for connected TVs across 25 media markets in the U.S. Search results will also include linked previews of news articles, since journalists usually write about breaking news first before producing more labor-intensive videos, and reminders that information about developing events can change quickly. These tests are being run in 25 markets across the US and Google says that local news has gotten "strong engagement" so far.

It also unveiled plans to challenge hoax videos that frequently appear during breaking news events, by showing.

On another front, YouTube said it has established a working group with news organizations and experts to help the video site develop new product features and improve the news experience on YouTube. Members already include Vox Media, Brazilian radio station Jovem Pan and India Today, with more to be added in the coming weeks.

He added that 10,000 human reviewers at Google - so-called search quality raters who monitor search results around the world - are helping determine what will count as authoritative sources and news stories. These two new features are now available in 17 countries including the U.S., U.K., France, Italy, Japan, India, Mexico, Brazil, South Africa, Nigeria, and more.

Rather than recommending a video first, the algorithm will point to a text-based story surfaced by Google News.

Mohan said the new features are in effect in 17 countries, including the U.S., and "we're looking to double that number in the coming months".

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