Published: Tue, July 10, 2018
Sci-tech | By April Francis

Starbucks is eliminating plastic straws from all stores

Starbucks is eliminating plastic straws from all stores

It's a plastic strawless lid that will come to replace single-use plastic straws that now inundate its coffee shops.

Starbucks's strawless lids "will become the standard for all iced coffee, tea and espresso beverages" in Seattle and Vancouver this fall.

In a move meant to cut back on waste, the global coffee giant said Monday that it would eliminate plastic straws from its more than 28,000 locations globally by 2020.

Other companies have been ditching plastic straws as bans on the item have gone into place.

The brewer is phasing out plastic, one-time-use straws, because of material waste and danger to aquatic sea life they can cause. As BBC News reported in February, a Scotland-based disability group called One in Five says paper, plant-based, and metal straws aren't adequate substitutes for single-use plastic straws and could even be risky for people, depending on their disability.

The strawless lid, which features a raised lip, is already available in more than 8,000 stores in the USA and Canada for select beverages.

Starbucks said the conversion will be complete by 2020.

The announcement from McDonald's followed an April proposal by the United Kingdom government to ban plastic straws in the country.

Starbucks is saying goodbye to its signature green plastic straws.

The announcement comes a week after Seattle, where the coffee house is headquartered, became one of the first high-profile cities in the U.S.to ban straws. In May, the European Union also suggested a ban on some plastic items, including straws.

Sixteen Tampa Bay businesses have received national Ocean Friendly certification through the coalition by voluntarily banning foam products and plastic bags, only providing straws and to-go utensils upon request, and enforcing recycling programs. Straws add up to about 2,000 tons of the almost 9 million tons of plastic waste that ends up in waters around the globe each year.

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