Published: Thu, July 05, 2018
Medicine | By Tracy Klein

Coffee may help you live longer, study finds

Coffee may help you live longer, study finds

People who drank eight or more cups of coffee a day had a 14 percent lower risk of dying over a 10-year study period, compared with those who didn't drink coffee, the researchers found.

The team at the National Cancer Institute used data from people taking part in a large genetic study in Britain called the U.K. Biobank. The mean age of the participants was 57 years (range, 38-73 years); 271 019 (54%) were female, and 387 494 (78%) were coffee drinkers. But the existing literature, including meta-analyses aggregating dozens of coffee studies involving millions of people, do show some notable associations between people who report drinking more coffee and protective effects against cardiovascular disease (the number one killer of Americans) like heart disease and stroke. Most were coffee drinkers; 154,000 or nearly one-third drank two to three cups daily and 10,000 drank at least eight cups daily.

"These findings suggest the importance of noncaffeine constituents in the coffee-mortality association and provide further reassurance that coffee drinking can be a part of a healthy diet", the authors write. In other words, a higher percentage of the non-coffee drinkers died.

"We know that some people metabolize caffeine quite slowly and are less tolerant of the apparent physical affects of caffeine, which of course comes from many sources other than coffee".

Brew addicts' daily coffee fix is probably doing wonders for their lifespan as a new study reveals that coffee drinkers are more likely to live longer.

"There are many potential beneficial compounds in coffee - there are literally hundreds and thousands of compounds in coffee", he said.

We've guzzled down similar findings before: Just last summer, two separate studies delivered similar good news about coffee and mortality.

While there are caveats to that claim, the new study found that a longer life was linked to any kind of coffee: instant, decaf, whatever.

Even if you already have mild memory impairment, moderate coffee consumption can slow its progress.

Enigma Cafe staff member Clarke Gardiner said coffee for him was "the essence of energy to wake up in the morning", drinking multiple coffees every day at work - including at night time.

Other studies have suggested that substances in coffee may reduce inflammation and improve how the body uses insulin, which can reduce chances for developing diabetes.

And some of their habits and characteristics might make these British coffee-drinkers look unhealthier to start with.

And the researchers say there's no added benefit to drinking more coffee than one usually does.

The study covered people who drank instant, ground and decaffeinated coffee.

Adding toppings to coffee like cream, sugar and whipped cream can also vastly increase calories, and possibly negate it's positive effects.

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