Published: Wed, June 13, 2018
Worldwide | By Myra Stephens

United Kingdom minister resigns, plans to rebel over parliament's Brexit role

United Kingdom minister resigns, plans to rebel over parliament's Brexit role

The government's eleventh hour amendment, lifted in large parts from Tory Remainer Dominic Grieve's own proposal and to be presented to the Lords on Monday, is expected to give MPs the right to veto the government's strategy if it fails to secure a political agreement with the European Union by 30 November.

Ahead of the crucial votes, Brexit Secretary David Davis warned MPs that defeat would undermine the UK's negotiating stance in Brussels.

Facing the prospect of losing a vote on a crucial amendment to the government's flagship Brexit legislation - which was created to empower parliament to vote down the final deal without risking a "no-deal" exit from the bloc - ministers intervened with a concession at the 11th hour even as MPs were wrapping up debate on the controversial measure.

Two days of debate on the laws that will end Britain's European Union membership have crystallised long-running divisions within May's party about the best strategy for leaving the European Union, bringing to a head issues that will determine the relationship between the world's fifth-largest economy and its biggest trading bloc. Other flashpoints in the parliamentary votes include proposals to keep Britain tightly aligned with the E.U.'s economy.

Pro-EU Conservative backbenchers had threatened to defy the prime minister and vote in favour of giving parliament a "meaningful vote" on the Brexit deal.

Grieve's proposal also suggested if no deal was reached by February 15, the government would be required to allow the House of Commons to set the terms of the deal.

A junior British justice minister said on Tuesday he will resign and will vote with pro-European Union rebels who want parliament to have the power to force the government to go back to the negotiating table if they reject a Brexit deal.

In a highly charged atmosphere in parliament, lawmakers who oppose the government said they had received death threats and brandished a copy of one of Britain's tabloid newspapers, the Daily Express, which ran a headline saying: "Ignore the will of the people at your peril".

Ukip leader Gerard Batten said: "The only "meaningful vote" was the verdict of the people in referendum of 23rd June 2016".

What happened to the Bill in the House of Lords?

A Downing Street source said: "We will get a good Brexit deal that works for everybody in the UK".

Leading Conservative rebels welcomed the "important concessions" by the government, but insisted that ministers must follow through on their concession or face a defeat when the bill returns to the House of Commons later this month.

Few at Westminster expect a challenge to the prime minister's position this week.

Solicitor General Robert Buckland promised to discuss incorporating concerns raised by former attorney general and rebel Dominic Grieve.

Nick said: "You were told what to do, why won't you do it?"

"We cannot remain in the Customs Union and sign our own trade deals meaning that Britain could not make the most of the opportunities that Brexit presents".

Keir Starmer, Labour's shadow Brexit secretary, was refusing to accept the government at its word Tuesday.

Jeremy Corbyn made fun of the deep divisions within Theresa May's cabinet over Brexit during PMQs on Wednesday, after the prime minister narrowly avoided a humiliating defeat in parliament.

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