Published: Mon, June 11, 2018
Sci-tech | By April Francis

Explainer: Indian scientists discover exoplanet 600 light years from Earth

Explainer: Indian scientists discover exoplanet 600 light years from Earth

Scientists have named the host star as EPIC 211945201 or K2-236. It goes around the star in about 19.5 days. This has listed India among the countries which have discoveries of planets to their credit.

Indigenously designed "PRL Advance Radial-velocity Abu-Sky Search" (PARAS) spectrograph integrated with a 1.2m telescope, was used to measure the mass of the planet, which facilitated the discovery of the planet.

It is being reported that when it comes to the temperature of the three planets that are the same size as Earth, this is where the similarity ends as they would nearly certainly have surface temperatures that are much higher than our planet owing to the intense radiation given by the red dwarf star they orbit. Isro said very few such spectrographs exist around the world (mostly in the United States and Europe) that can do such precise measurements. "It is closer to Neptune", he said, pointing out that the new planet had 27 times the mass of Earth and six times its radius.

This is the first of its kind spectrograph in India with a resolution of 60,000 which can measure the mass of a planet going around a star. The PRL scientists observed the target for around 420 days for probing the nature of the system using the PARAS spectrograph. This detection is important as it adds to a sparse catalog of confirmed exoplanets with masses between 10-70 MEarth and radii between 4-8 REarth, whose masses and radii are measured to a precision of 50% or better.

Ahmedabad, have discovered an exoplanet that is larger than Neptune but smaller than Saturn. "Over the next few years, I expect that they will be able to make further contributions to this exciting field of astronomy".

According to SciTech Daily, John Grunsfeld, from NASA's Science Mission Directorate, explained that the Kepler spacecraft has yielded many surprises, and with the discovery of three new rocky planet, s we may be closer now to learning whether these other planetary systems may harbor life of some kind. However, he said, radial velocity observations as made in this case "are not, in general, discovery observations but [a] look at already known planetary systems for a better understanding of their nature".

Like this: